USDA Designates 45 Kansas Counties as Primary Natural Disaster Areas

This Secretarial natural disaster designation allows the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) to extend much-needed emergency credit to producers recovering from natural disasters through emergency loans. Emergency loans can be used to meet various recovery needs including the replacement of essential items such as equipment or livestock, reorganization of a farming operation or the refinance of certain debts. FSA will review the loans based on the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, these counties suffered from a drought intensity value during the growing season of 1) D2 Drought-Severe for 8 or more consecutive weeks or 2) D3 Drought-Extreme or D4 Drought-Exceptional. Impacted Area: Kansas Triggering Disaster: Drought Application Deadline: Dec. 8, 2022 Primary Counties Eligible: Barber Ellis Haskell Pratt Sheridan Barton Ellsworth Kearny Rawlins Sherman Chautauqua Finney Kiowa Reno Stafford Cheyenne Ford Labette Rice Stanton Clark Grant Meade Rooks Stevens Comanche Gray Montgomery Rush Sumner Cowley Greeley Morton Russell Thomas Decatur Hamilton Osborne Scott Wallace Edwards Harper Pawnee Seward Wichita   Contiguous Counties Also Eligible: Kansas: Butler, Cherokee, Crawford, Elk, Grove, Graham, Harvey, Hodgeman, Jewell, Kingman, Lane, Lincoln, Logan, McPherson, Mitchell, Neosho, Ness, Norton, Phillips, Saline, Sedgwick, Smith, Trego, Wilson Colorado: Baca, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Kit Carson, Prowers, Yuma

Nebraska: Dundy, Furnas, Hitchcock, Red Willow

Oklahoma: Alfalfa, Beaver, Cimarron, Craig, Grant, Harper, Kay, Nowata, Osage, Texas, Washington, Wood.  More Resources On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery ToolDisaster Assistance-at-a-Glance fact sheet, and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help you determine program or loan options. To file a Notice of Loss or to ask questions about available programs, contact your local  USDA Service Center.
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