Author Archives: kansasfgc

When it comes to restoring rangeland habitats, there is no replacement for “prescribed fire”

USDA-ARS – Using fire with a stated objective—a strategy known as prescribed fire—is widely recognized as an effective way to remove standing, dead vegetation on rangelands. But fear of fire has left some to wonder if mowing or close grazing confers … Continue reading

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

21 January 2020 Kansas Hay Market Report

Hay market trade is slow, demand was slow, prices remain steady. Seems as if Mother Nature is finally delivering winter weather to Kansas. Last Friday all but a half a dozen counties were under a winter weather advisory as snow … Continue reading

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

14 January 2020 Kansas Hay Market Report

Hay market trade is slow, demand was slow, prices remain steady on limited test. Winter weather moved into the state over the weekend dropping several inches of rain over the central and eastern part of the state before changing over … Continue reading

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

07 January 2020 Kansas Hay Market Report

Hay market trade is slow, demand was slow, prices remain steady on limited test. 01-07-20 Hay Report FINAL

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

Characterizing patterns and outcomes of large wildfire in the Great Plains: Are we growing a wildfire problem?

By Victoria Donovan See Video

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

Evaluating Rules of Thumb for Grazing Management

By Keith Harmoney, Range Scientist, Hays KSU BEEFTIPS – Over the years, I’ve heard rangeland managers develop rules of thumb, or short phrases, to try to help them simplify decisions that need to be made to manage their pastures.  Some … Continue reading

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog

Precision ag tools for rangelands: Part One

BEEFMAGAZINE & RANGE_EAST – Mention “precision agriculture” and most often the focus is on cropping systems. But that’s changing as precision ag technology is now being applied to rangeland settings, according to Mitch Stephenson, a University of Nebraska assistant professor … Continue reading

Posted in Hay Clippings Blog